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Companions in the underwater world

While we can't celebrate International Friendship Day every day, we still like to celebrate our friends, family and dive buddies. Let's take a quick look at the connections we find in the underwater world:

LONGIMANUS AND PILOT FISH

A longimanus and its group of pilot fish are one of the most iconic scenes in the ocean. The shark's gigantic size (up to 4 meters/13 feet in length) and its large pectoral fins provide an ideal haven for its small striped companions who return the favor by cleansing its body and mouth of various parasites. Although pilot fish sometimes follow other large pelagic creatures (sometimes even ships), longimanus remain their preferred companions.

FRENCH ANGEL FISH

French angelfish, the underwater world's answer to Romeo and Juliet, are found almost exclusively in pairs and are one of the few creatures on earth to enjoy a monogamous relationship that lasts their entire life. Usually, they swim together towards the surface where they release their eggs and sperm, unceremoniously sending away anyone who gets too close. They can be seen along coral reefs in the western Atlantic, where they like to approach divers for snooping.

HERRING

These sociable fish, always looking for food on the seabed, are not satisfied with one or two friends, but can count on billion. Herring, with their schools covering an area of about five square kilometers/3.1 square miles, constitute one of the largest groupings in the animal kingdom. To avoid a perceived danger, the school moves away and creates a ring shape. Furthermore, herring are fish of the bench and, if they are separated, they can die.

SEA ANEMONE AND CLOWN FISH

An anemone fish (clown fish) is rarely found far from the plant of the same name and for a very specific reason. The small fish, made famous by a Disney film, is immune to the toxic tentacles of the plant which, however, represents a safe place to live and find some food. In this partnership, Nemo's role is to repel predators and keep the "house" in order. However, anemone fish are a bit temperamental; in fact, they are seen hanging out in the company of creatures such as pom-pom crabs.

DIVERS

Of course, we couldn't write an article about dive buddies without including ourselves! Unlike the creatures above, divers can be found all over the world, in all shapes and sizes, and display all kinds of behaviors. Thanks to various magazines, shows and films, you can find out more about the different types of diving couples you might meet on your next trip.

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